How to Find & Clean Up the AnonymousFox Hack

The AnonymousFox hack targets insecure websites and actively exploits them to spread phishing, spam, and other malware. A major nuisance for website owners, it also happens to be one of the more prevalent types of malware seen on client sites in the past two years.

In this post we’ll describe what AnonymousFox is and how it works, describe common indicators of compromise, and outline the steps you can take to mitigate risk of an infection.

Continue reading How to Find & Clean Up the AnonymousFox Hack at Sucuri Blog.

2021 Threat Report Webinar

The threat landscape is constantly shifting.

As attackers continue to hone their tools and exploit new vulnerabilities, our team works diligently to identify and analyze threats posed to webmasters.

So – what do you need to do to stay one step ahead of attackers? Join Sucuri researcher Ben Martin on July 6th in our latest webinar to uncover the latest insights into emerging and ongoing trends and threats in the website security landscape.

Continue reading 2021 Threat Report Webinar at Sucuri Blog.

Tips for WP-Config & How to Avoid Sensitive Data Exposure

The wp-config file is a powerful core WordPress file that is vital for running your website. It contains important configuration settings for WordPress, including details on where to find the database, login credentials, name and host. This config file is also used to define advanced options for database elements, security keys, and developer options.

In this post, we’ll outline some important website hardening recommendations for your wp-config file and explain exactly how to safely update it to avoid sensitive data exposure.

Continue reading Tips for WP-Config & How to Avoid Sensitive Data Exposure at Sucuri Blog.

WooCommerce Credit Card Skimmer Uses Telegram Bot to Exfiltrate Stolen Data

Our story starts like many others told on this blog: A new client came to us with reported cases of credit card theft on their eCommerce website.

The website owner had received complaints from several customers who reported bogus transactions on their cards shortly after purchasing from their webstore, so the webmaster suspected that something could be amiss.

Fortunately our new client wasted no time in seeking a solution and came to us for help almost immediately after receiving the complaints.

Continue reading WooCommerce Credit Card Skimmer Uses Telegram Bot to Exfiltrate Stolen Data at Sucuri Blog.

PSA: Critical Vulnerability Patched in Ninja Forms WordPress Plugin

On June 16, 2022, the Wordfence Threat Intelligence team noticed a back-ported security update in Ninja Forms, a WordPress plugin with over one million active installations. As with all security updates in WordPress plugins and themes, our team analyzed the plugin to determine the exploitability and severity of the vulnerability that had been patched.

We uncovered a code injection vulnerability that made it possible for unauthenticated attackers to call a limited number of methods in various Ninja Forms classes, including a method that unserialized user-supplied content, resulting in Object Injection. This could allow attackers to execute arbitrary code or delete arbitrary files on sites where a separate POP chain was present.

There is evidence to suggest that this vulnerability is being actively exploited in the wild, and as such we are alerting our users immediately to the presence of this vulnerability.

This flaw has been fully patched in versions 3.0.34.2, 3.1.10, 3.2.28, 3.3.21.4, 3.4.34.2, 3.5.8.4, and 3.6.11.WordPress appears to have performed a forced automatic update for this plugin, so your site may already be using one of the patched version. Nonetheless, we strongly recommend ensuring that your site has been updated to one of the patched versions as soon as possible since automatic updates are not always successful.

Wordfence Premium, Wordfence Care, and Wordfence Response customers received a rule on June 16, 2022 to protect against active exploitation of this vulnerability. Wordfence users still using the free version will receive the same protection on July 16, 2022. Regardless of your protection status with Wordfence, you can update the plugin on your site to one of the patched versions to avoid exploitation.


Description: Code Injection
Affected Plugin: Ninja Forms Contact Form – The Drag and Drop Form Builder for WordPress
Plugin Slug: ninja-forms
Plugin Developer: Saturday Drive
Affected Versions: 3.6-3.6.10, 3.5-3.5.8.3, 3.4-3.4.34.1, 3.3-3.3.21.3, 3.2-3.2.27, 3.1-3.1.9, 3.0-3.0.34.1
CVE ID: Pending
CVSS Score: 9.8 (Critical)
CVSS Vector: CVSS:3.1/AV:N/AC:L/PR:N/UI:N/S:U/C:H/I:H/A:H
Fully Patched Version:  3.0.34.2, 3.1.10, 3.2.28, 3.3.21.4, 3.4.34.2, 3.5.8.4, 3.6.11

Ninja Forms is a popular WordPress plugin designed to enhance WordPress sites with easily customizable forms. One feature of Ninja Forms is the ability to add “Merge Tags” to forms that will auto-populate values from other areas of WordPress like Post IDs and logged in user’s names. Unfortunately, this functionality had a flaw that made it possible to call various Ninja Form classes that could be used for a wide range of exploits targeting vulnerable WordPress sites.

Without providing too many details on the vulnerability, the Merge Tag functionality does an is_callable() check on a supplied Merge Tags. When a callable class and method is supplied as a Merge Tag, the function is called and the code executed. These Merge Tags can be supplied by unauthenticated users due to the way NF_MergeTags_Other class handles Merge Tags.

We determined that this could lead to a variety of exploit chains due to the various classes and functions that the Ninja Forms plugin contains. One potentially critical exploit chain in particular involves the use of the NF_Admin_Processes_ImportForm class to achieve remote code execution via deserialization, though there would need to be another plugin or theme installed on the site with a usable gadget.

As we learn more about the exploit chains attackers are using to exploit this vulnerability, we will update this post.

Conclusion

In today’s post, we detailed a critical vulnerability in Ninja Forms Contact Form which allows unauthenticated attackers to call static methods on a vulnerable site that could be used for the site. This can be used to completely take over a WordPress site. There is evidence to suggest that this vulnerability is being actively exploited. 

This flaw has been fully patched in versions 3.0.34.2, 3.1.10, 3.2.28, 3.3.21.4, 3.4.34.2, 3.5.8.4, and 3.6.11. It appears as though WordPress may have performed a forced update so your site may already be on one of the patched versions. Nonetheless, we strongly recommend ensuring that your site has been updated to one of the patched versions as soon as possible.

Wordfence Premium, Wordfence Care, and Wordfence Response customers received a rule on June 16, 2022 to protect against active exploitation of this vulnerability. Wordfence users still using the free version will receive the same protection on July 16, 2022. Regardless of your protection status with Wordfence, you can update the plugin on your site to one of the patched versions to avoid exploitation.

If you believe your site has been compromised as a result of this vulnerability or any other vulnerability, we offer Incident Response services via Wordfence Care. If you need your site cleaned immediately, Wordfence Response offers the same service with 24/7/365 availability and a 1-hour response time. Both these products include hands-on support in case you need further assistance.

If you know a friend or colleague who is using this plugin on their site, we highly recommend forwarding this advisory to them to help keep their sites protected, as this is a serious vulnerability that can lead to complete site takeover.

Special thanks to Ramuel Gall, a Wordfence Threat Analyst, for his work reverse engineering the vulnerability’s patches to develop a working Proof of Concept and for his contributions to this post. 

The post PSA: Critical Vulnerability Patched in Ninja Forms WordPress Plugin appeared first on Wordfence.

Top Five Attacking IPs This Month: Their Locations May Not Be Where You Think

At Wordfence, we see large amounts of threat actor data, and often that data tells unexpected stories. Taking a look at just the top five attacking IP addresses over a 30 day period, you might be surprised to find out where these attacks are originating, and what they are doing. When most people hear about threat actors, they think about countries like Russia, China, and North Korea. In reality, attacks originate from all over the world, with the top five attackers we have tracked over the past 30 days coming from Australia, Germany, the United States, Ukraine, and Finland.

The purpose of these attacks is nearly as varied as their locations. Each of the top five malicious IP addresses was found to be attempting unauthorized access to websites or file systems. In sixth place was an IP address that was attempting brute force attacks, but the remaining malicious IP addresses in the top ten were all found to be attempting malicious access by other means. Several of the addresses were seen scanning for vulnerabilities, downloading or uploading files, accessing web shells, and even viewing or writing custom wp-config.php files. While one of the malicious indicators was consistent across all of the top five IP addresses, there are also some actions that were unique to a specific attack source.

IP Threat #1 Originating From Australia

The IP address found in Australia, 20.213.156.164, which is owned by Microsoft, may seem like the most surprising one to make this list, let alone first on the list. In a 30 day period, we tracked 107,569,810 requests from this single IP address out of Sydney. The threat actor using this IP was primarily attempting to open potential web shells on victims’ websites which could indicate that the attacker was looking for left-over webshells from other attackers’ successful exploits.

This is a common technique for threat actors, as it can be automated and does not require actively uploading their own shells and backdoors to a potential victim’s website. This could help the attacker save time and money instead of launching their own attack campaign to compromise servers.

The following is an example of a request the offending IP tried to make to access a known shell. It was blocked by the Wordfence firewall.

IP Threat #2 Originating From Germany

The German IP address, 217.160.145.62, may have a tracked attack quantity that is around 35% lower than the Sydney IP address, with only 70,752,527 tracked events, but its actions are much more varied. In fact, this IP address triggered four different web application firewall (WAF) rules, including  attempts to upload zip files to the attacked websites. This is a common action performed as a first step to get malicious files onto the server. There were also attempts to exploit a remote code execution (RCE) vulnerability in the Tatsu Builder plugin, and access the wp-config.php file from a web-visible location.

Sample of an exploit targeting the Tatsu Builder plugin vulnerability from this IP Address.

IP Threat #3 Originating From The United States

The attacks originating from the IP address 20.29.48.70 in the United States were slightly lower in quantity than those from Germany, with 54,020,587 detected events. The logged events are similar to those found coming from Australia. Searching for previously installed shells and backdoors appears to be the main purpose of these attacks as well. It’s important to note that this does not indicate that a backdoor is actually present on the site. This is just a method attackers use in hopes of landing on a webshell that had been installed previously by another attacker to save time and resources.  One filename we saw the IP address attempting to access is commonly used to serve spam or redirect to potentially malicious e-commerce websites.

Example of a pharma website that was the end result of a redirect chain.

IP Threat #4 Originating from Ukraine

The attacks starting in Ukraine are from the IP address 194.38.20.161, and the purpose of these attacks is different from what we see from the IP addresses in the other entries in the top five. The majority of the 51,293,613 requests appear to be checking for jQuery upload capabilities on the affected websites. This is done with a web request that uses a JPEG image file in an attempted upload. Once they know an upload is possible, the attacker can upload malicious files that range from spam to backdoors, and everything in between.

IP Threat #5 Originating From Finland

Rounding out our top five with only 44,954,492 registered events is the IP address 65.108.195.44 from Helsinki, Finland. This one also attempts to access web shells and backdoors. The majority of requests from this IP address seem to be accessing previously uploaded malicious files, rather than trying to exploit vulnerabilities or activate code that was added to otherwise legitimate files, such as the example below.

The s_e.php file sample in its raw form: a file this IP was trying to access.

One Thing in Common: All IPs Made it on to the Wordfence IP Blocklist

While the threat actors behind these IP addresses may have tried a variety of methods to gain control of these WordPress sites, one thing all these IP addresses have in common is that their attempts were blocked by the Wordfence Network and made their way onto the Wordfence IP Blocklist, a Premium feature of Wordfence.

This means that due to the volume of attacks these IP addresses were initiating they ended up on the Wordfence Real-Time IP blocklist, which prevents these IP addresses from accessing your site in the first place.

Conclusion

While the top five locations may not be commonly thought of as locations that web attacks may originate from, these are areas where computers and the internet are common. Wherever you have both of these, you will have attack origins. What is not as surprising is that despite widely varied locations for attackers, the methods they use are typically common and often predictable. Hosting accounts that threat actors use to launch attacks can live anywhere in the world while a threat actor themselves may be in an entirely different location.

By knowing how an attacker thinks, and the methods they use, we can defend against their attacks. These top five offenders averaged more than 10 million access attempts per day in the reviewed period, but having a proper web application firewall with Wordfence in place meant the attackers had no chance of accomplishing their goals.

All Wordfence users with the Wordfence Web Application Firewall active, including Wordfence free customers, are protected against the types of attacks seen from these IP addresses, and the vulnerabilities they may be attempting to exploit.If you believe your site has been compromised as a result of this vulnerability or any other vulnerability, we offer Incident Response services via Wordfence Care. If you need your site cleaned immediately, Wordfence Response offers the same service with 24/7/365 availability and a 1-hour response time. Both these products include hands-on support in case you need further assistance.

The post Top Five Attacking IPs This Month: Their Locations May Not Be Where You Think appeared first on Wordfence.

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